TypeManufactur

Satzschriften von Georg Salden


Letter g rendered on a screen in 10px (enlarged).

Our font families Daphne Script, Planet, Polo, Videon and Zitat are currently available for use on the web. We are working hard to make all our fonts available. Web fonts are specially made for the web and optimized for screen rendering. Unlike for printed media they enable individual web typography. Web fonts come in the formats EOT, WOFF and TTF, and support all common browser.

License
The license is valid for a specific domain, which is indicated when ordering. As for desktop fonts the prices for our web fonts are based on the size of the company which owns the domain. Web fonts cover the Western and Central European character set.

Hinting
Our web fonts are hinted for ClearType rendering. Hinting is a font technology of screen optimizing by which fonts are adjusted for maximum readability on computer monitors. Since the resolution of the screen is considerable less than in print, in small sizes there are not enough pixels available to represent each letter exactly. Hints make sure that the font is displayed evenly and thus enables optimum readability. Hinting is required only for Microsoft Windows. Mac OS renders differently, and, although it ignores font hinting completely, displays all fonts comparatively good.

Install Web Fonts
Upload the font files to your web server. You need three files for each font style you want to use in your site (EOT, WOFF, TTF). Use the CSS code example below to address your web fonts. Replace the example font file URL with its appropriate path on your server.

@font-face {
font-family: 'MyWebfont';
src: url('/fonts/Webfont.eot');
src: url('/fonts/Webfont.eot?iefix') format('eot'),
url('/fonts/Webfont.woff') format('woff'),
url('/fonts/Webfont.ttf') format('truetype'),
}

The value of the font-family declaration ('MyWebfont' in the example above) is only used internally in your style definitions, so you could set it to any name you like. You can then reference your font family in CSS font stacks by the name you gave it as you would any other (system) font. For example:

p { font-family: 'WebFont', Arial, sans-serif; }